Victim’s Grandson Shoots Home Intruder–Gun Control to the Rescue–Not!

A recent Gallup poll found that for the first time in a few years, a majority of Americans want more gun control. I guess the media’s hard work in trying to instill fear and terror in the hearts of their viewers is finally starting to pay off.

A majority of Americans wouldn’t have that opinion if stories like this one were given the national spotlight:

An unidentified man was shot in West Plains, Missouri, after attempting to rob an elderly woman in her home around 3:45 a.m. Sunday morning. The woman’s grandson saw the disturbance and shot the intruder with a handgun according to OzarksFirst.com.

The suspect was taken to a hospital where he remains in critical condition.

Reports began coming in around 8:00 a.m. that an iPod, computers, GPS units, currency and a checkbook had all been stolen in the area of the shooting. This information led to police to a vehicle that was reported stolen at a local motel.

The police executed a search warrant on the motel where the vehicle was located and found Jeremy Irwin, 45, of Muncie, Indiana. Irwin admitted that his son Christopher had disappeared during the night and had tattoos that matched the suspect who had been shot leading some to believe his son could be the home intruder, according to ABC affiliate KSPR.

These kinds of stories remain local. Good news travels fast, but bad news travels faster. And it’s more profitable. Media networks know that people aren’t as attracted to good news stories as they are the bad and the shocking.

There have been many cases where a concealed carrier prevented a mass shooting from happening. And you’d think that that would make for great and profitable headlines the next day. But most people are going to think, “So, nothing bad happened? Only the bad guy died? Huh, sounds boring.”

But if that same situation had turned out to be another mass shooting because no concealed carrier was around, people would be interested, almost obsessed. They’d want to know everything about the person who murdered a bunch of people. They’d want to know what kind of person he was when he was in grade school, what kind of food he liked to eat, what kind of friends he had, what kind of music he liked to listen to, what his upbringing was like, what his romantic relationships were like, what he posted on Facebook and what profile picture he used. And the media would more than happy to satisfy all those curiosities.

People are only obsessive over villains. No one cares about the heroes. That’s why the media fixate on the villains. Just trying to keep their customers satisfied. And that’s why people are scared and think the government needs to “do something” about gun violence.