Surprise, Surprise – Liberal and Moderate Republicans Back Jeb Bush

Once again the RINO’s have come out to discuss what they saw at CPAC.

I’m always a little perturbed by these guys coming and hanging out with us at CPAC, pretending to be our friends and then drifting back to New York, LA or other major media markets to badmouth us. David Brooks for example says that CPAC attendees aren’t really conservatives – they’re actually the hardest of the “hardcore.” He then went on to praise Jeb Bush among all of the candidates and obviously prefers the most establishment of establishment candidates.

How he feels honest calling himself a conservative… I have no idea.

 

 

David Brooks: Yes. Well, this is CPAC, remember. There’s conservatives, and then there’s conservatives, and then conservatives, and then way over on the other side of the room is CPAC.

And so you look at the people they have nominated over the years as their favorite speaker, it’s Ron Paul, Rand Paul’s father. President Ron Paul has been elected, Gary Bauer, Christian conservative. So this is like the hardest of the hard core…

First, Jeb Bush did well. And so that was important, that if he stumbled, then a little rhythm gets going that Jeb Bush can’t really campaign very well, and so he did well. Scott Walker seems to do OK with Tea Party and with the establishment part. So that’s good.

Marco Rubio, fine, but what was, I guess, interesting was the foreign policy split. As we just heard, the hard-core interventionists were cheered. Rand Paul was cheered on the other thing. So, people are looking everything right now.

But I suspect the two main trends, so far, we see — I’m about to list three one, after saying two — one, pretty good candidates, better than last time, a lot of good candidates. Two, the party doesn’t know where it stands on foreign policy, but it’s a little more interventionist than they seemed. And, three — I’m not Rick Perry — I do remember — the social issues, abortion, a little less emphasized than in years past…

The party — like every party, the mood of the party shifts. The Democratic Party is clearly shifting an economic populist direction. But the party shifts.

And I think it’s a little more interventionist, a little less Tea Party, a little less social conservative than it seemed two years ago.