Fannie Mae Is At It Again!

Mortgage giant Fannie Mae, the too-big-to-fail bailout beneficiary, is apparently at it again—doing everything in its power to sink the economy into another recession:

The Federal Housing Finance Agency inspector general said its latest concerns involve Fannie Mae’s “haphazard” decision to fill a critical auditor position with an employee who lacked proper qualifications and suffered from a conflict of interest.

Unless Fannie Mae’s leaders and the audit committee that allowed the hiring do their jobs better, there is a “substantial risk” the mortgage company “will operate in an unsafe and unsound manner, suffer losses and expose U.S. taxpayers to further financial risks,” the inspector general said.

Acting recklessly? Taking unnecessary risks? Hiring unqualified people? What? I never would have expected this kind of behavior from Fannie Mae. End sarcasm. I hate the civil government so much sometimes. Fannie Mae should have been allowed to die. A horrible death. We subsidized incompetence with the bailouts. What did we think we would get? Less incompetence?

When will we learn? You get more of what you subsidize. If you pay people to stay jobless, guess what? They’ll stay jobless. If you pay people to have children out of wedlock, you’ll have fewer two-parent households. If you pay companies when they fail, they have no reason to succeed. If you keep voting compromisers and liars into office, you’ll have no honest politicians in Washington. This is the natural and reasonable way of the world.

So what do we do about the albatross that is Fannie Mae? Force it to function as a private business, for one. Stop subsidizing its risky behavior. Stop subsidizing it at all. Perhaps people think that might make it harder for poor people to own houses. But what’s worse? Poor people not owning houses or the whole country sinking into another major depression?

Furthermore, maybe if the economy and our money were allowed to function according to the natural rules of the market, more poor people would be able to buy houses because their money would be worth more and house prices would not rise on the promise of federal subsidies. But perhaps such thinking is a little too reasonable for the current government to grasp.