Is China Set to Be the World’s Greatest Christian Nation?

According to an article in the Telegraph, China is on schedule to comprise the globe’s largest population of Christians within fifteen years:

“By my calculations China is destined to become the largest Christian country in the world very soon,” said Fenggang Yang, a professor of sociology at Purdue University and author of Religion in China: Survival and Revival under Communist Rule. “It is going to be less than a generation. Not many people are prepared for this dramatic change.”

 

China’s Protestant community, which had just one million members in 1949, has already overtaken those of countries more commonly associated with an evangelical boom. . . . Prof Yang . . . believes that number will swell to around 160 million by 2025. That would likely put China ahead even of the United States, which had around 159 million Protestants in 2010 but whose congregations are in decline.

The article’s headline says that China will be the “world’s most Christian nation,” but that isn’t exactly true. China has a huge population, and even if China has more Christians than America does within fifteen years, that wouldn’t necessarily mean that the nation itself is more Christian. 150 million Christians is a serious majority in the United States. But it would account for only about ten percent of China’s massive population.

Nonetheless, the statistics are quite startling. While the United States is abandoning its Christian heritage and republican1 roots to dabble more deeply in secularism, socialism, and nanny government, China is shedding its atheist heritage and tyrannical roots to embrace Christianity and the free market.

And while the US is certainly in decline on the world stage, China is on the rise. It seems pretty obvious that China’s prosperity is directly linked to its adoption of Western economic strategies and, now, religion. Is this correlation lost on everyone but me?

  1. Notice, I did not write “Republican.” If you don’t know the difference, you’re part of the problem. []