Carly Fiorina Disappoints With Rape and Incest Abortion Exception

I’m going to stand in the gap for that child that you don’t think deserves a right because his father is a criminal…Baby Doe, that child who we’ll never meet, is going to have a trial today. And we’re going to decide if it’s guilty of a capital offense because its father was a criminal.” – Lee Bright

I’ve been a big Carly Fiorina fan ever since she announced her candidacy for president. She’s brilliant, articulate, and unafraid to take on the media. However, it must be said that her most recent foray into abortion policy left me uncomfortable.

In a recent interview, Fiorina said:

“I am pro-life by virtue of faith and experience and now science. And I am tired of being scared away from this topic by leftist women…so I think we need to just keep pressing this topic and not be afraid to bring it up because the left really wants to shut this conversation down.”

Then she said something that left me shaking my head. Speaking of exceptions for rape and incest, she said:

“When a woman has been subjected to an act of violence, which is what rape or incest is, really, against her choice…And so, then I think we have to have really special empathy for the pain and suffering that she goes through.”

She’s technically correct in her assertion; we do need to have empathy for these women. However, our empathy must also extend to her unborn child. Fiorina herself said while on “The View” that the DNA in a zygote is the same as the DNA we have when we die. She presented the argument that we are all human, no matter the stage of development. So how can she then turn around and say that exceptions for these violent offenses are acceptable?

She can say it because no politician—aside from Lee Bright—is willing to argue the logical extension of their beliefs. They fear it won’t play well, and they won’t get elected. I can only assume that if Carly Fiorina truly believes that life begins at conception, or that a zygote is as human as we are—which she herself seemed to assert—that she wouldn’t make exceptions for their execution.

Yes, rape and forced conception of any kind is cruel; it’s an evil act. However, it’s an evil act on the part of the man committing the crime. No child should suffer for the sins of his father. An abortion will not erase the scars from the mind of the woman who was raped. Additionally, life is not fair, and life is not easy, but we are designed to carry seemingly unfathomable burdens; we carry mental strength beyond our own understanding.

Ask any of the women who are part of the “Save the 1%” organization, many of whom suffered rape, and decided it was the right thing to carry their child to term. They love their sons and daughters, and their sons and daughters love them. Was it more difficult than we can imagine? I’m sure. But they are an example of women who used every ounce of their strength, and whose children are grateful they did. Watch any interview with these women, and you will see absolute joy—joy which they chose to steal from the hands of the misery they were handed.

It’s not impossible. And I don’t believe a child should be targeted for termination by virtue of its father’s crime. That’s not fair. That’s not right. That’s not moral.

Given that, I’m disappointed that Carly Fiorina would make such exceptions. I’m sure there is not a single candidate on the Republican side that wouldnot make those exceptions. They are popular, and to argue otherwise is seen as offensive. But it doesn’t mean it’s right. As Marcus Aurelius said, our goal in life isn’t to find ourselves on the side of the majority, but to escape finding ourself among the ranks of the insane. To mark an infant for execution that you would have otherwise protected simply because of the crime of its father is truly insane.

I hope that Carly Fiorina changes her mind, and I hope that other candidates will have the bravery of Lee Bright when discussing this issue. It’s not a throwaway line; it’s not simply an exception that must be made to stay politically relevant; it’s a moral issue that must be dealt with in a real way.

We cannot put a black X on the foreheads of particular children, then turn around and argue for the sanctity of life. It’s hypocritical at best, and negligent at worst.