Leon Eisenberg - Father Of ADHD Calls Himself A Liar

“ADHD is a prime example of a fictitious disease.”

These were the words of Leon Eisenberg, the “scientific father of ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder),” in his last interview before his death.

Leon Eisenberg made a luxurious living off of his “fictitious disease,” thanks to pharmaceutical sales. Coincidentally, he received the “Ruane Prize for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Research. He has been a leader in child psychiatry for more than 40 years through his work in pharmacological trials, research, teaching, and social policy and for his theories of autism and social medicine,” according to Psychiatric News.

Yes, it was even admitted that they are his THEORIES. The medical industry is using the guise of helping children to depersonalize and disconnect our children from a healthy, normal upbringing. Parents are placing their children on these drugs and subjecting them to what the world has to offer, when in fact all these children are looking for is their parents in hopes of being the blessing that God intended them to be.

In the United States, 1 out of 10 boys among 10-year-olds takes medication for ADHD on a daily basis … with increasing tendency. And with the help of Teen Screen surveys in public schools, they are attempting to set up the student for the fall.

American psychologist Lisa Cosgrove and others reveal the facts in their study “Financial Ties between DSM-IV Panel Members and the Pharmaceutical Industry.” They found that “Of the 170 DSM panel members 95 (56 percent) had one or more financial associations with companies in the pharmaceutical industry. One hundred percent of the members of the panels on ‘Mood Disorders’ and ‘Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders’ had financial ties to drug companies.”

And they are reaping major benefits off of this “fictitious disease.” For example, the assistant director of the Pediatric Psychopharmacology Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital and associate professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School received “$1 million in earnings from drug companies between 2000 and 2007.”

Marc-André Gagnon and Joel Lexchin, a long-time researcher of pharmaceutical promotion, performed a study which shows that the U.S. pharmaceutical industry spent 24.4 percent of the sales dollar on promotion, versus 13.4 percent for research and development in 2004. That is almost twice as much money on pushing their drugs on the people than research to make sure it is safe!

This raises the following question: Are they safe?

Read the antidepressant black-box warning for yourselves, and you will be alarmed by the side effects listed on the inserts:

  • Confusion
  • Depersonalization
  • Hostility
  • Hallucinations
  • Manic reactions
  • Suicidal ideation
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Delusions
  • Feeling drunk
  • Alcohol abuse
  • Homicidal ideation

Why would any parent subject their children to drugs with such dangerous side effects?

Dr. Edward C. Hamlyn, a founding member of the Royal College of General Practitioners, in 1998 stated, “ADHD is fraud intended to justify starting children on a life of drug addiction.”

The “attention deficit” lies in the responsibility of the parents, not the child. Scripture tells us that the parent is to “train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it (Proverbs 22:6),” not the other way around.

To take it a step further, the video below explores what is being overlooked – namely, the alarming studies linking antidepressants to mass murder:

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Bradlee Dean is an ordained preacher, heavy metal drummer, talk-show host of the Sons of Liberty Radio, and speaks on college and high school campuses with his ministry, You Can Run But You Cannot Hide International. Follow Bradlee on Twitter and Like Him on Facebook.

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  • Evermyrtle

    These drugs should not be used except in extreme cases. I once knew this little boy born rather late in life to this couple, who already had teenaged daughters. He was rambunctious as little boys tend to be. His mother did not know to handle this little intrusion into her life. She allowed the doctors to prescribe some of thes drugs for this precious little boy,  he became like a zombie. It was so sad to see him like that. I moved away and do not know if she kept him on these awful drugs but hope not.

  • BH206L3

    Well they give kids this stuff for just being kids. Gee when I was a child and acted up or and such behavior, Mom would set me straight right away. Today she would be in trouble for suspected child abuse. After all I learned the use of four letter words in ear shot of mom meant that I had the date with a bar of soap rather than some mouth wash. I learned my the time I was 7 that using four letter words was well not only rude but I would have an experience that I didn’t like. For a long time I wondered about kids doing the sort of things mentioned, if the drugs they are taking were not part of the problem. After all I got my first gun when I was 7 and in all the years since never dawned on my that I could go shoot my class mates for doing what kids do. Then again till I was 57 I was never on any kind of drug for a long period of time either.  Now I take some meds do to blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. I would not want to be a kid trying to grow up today, no way!

    • DMJ

      BH206L3 Doesn’t sound like you had ADHD; you were just a boy.  If you really did have ADHD, you would have a very tough time controlling that behavior.

  • DMJ

    It is NOT a fictitious disease!  That it is being over-diagnosed, I can agree with.  But there are some people that do have ADHD.  There are several members of my extended family that has this condition and most are not on Ritalin.  They have just learned the difficulties caused by this condition and learned how to deal with them.

    • patriot53

      DMJ There have always been hyperactive kids. ADHD is not real and NEVER has been.

      • DMJ

        patriot53 DMJ Unless you have a family member who has ADHD, then you really don’t know what you are talking about.

        • patriot53

          DMJ  worked in mental health with institutionalized boys for many years. I recognize real trouble – or FAKE trouble. ADHD is FAKE.

        • DMJ

          patriot53 DMJ I raised a son who has ADHD and have several nephews as well who also have it.  I also have two children who do not have this condition.  Having raised three children, I too, know the difference between real trouble and fake trouble. I can tell you, without a doubt, that ADHD is NOT fake.  I think there are a lot of kids who are incorrectly diagnosed with this condition, but that is another story.  Just because some are mis-diagnosed does not mean that there aren’t some who do have it.
          I have never made excuses for my son’s behavior nor let him get away with bad behavior, even if he couldn’t help it.  To do so would be handicapping him for life.  I had the same standards for him as I had for my two children who didn’t have ADHD.

          Even before I discovered my son had ADHD, I knew something was drastically different with him and he needed help to overcome it. Once I was able to identify what he had, I was able to find ways to help him..
          My son had trouble with controlling his impulses until he was 12, and it wasn’t for lack of trying, either.  He also had and still has trouble being organized and completing tasks.  To this day, he has an amazing amount of energy.  Because I told him that he had to overcome the obstacles and difficulties of ADHD and not to use it as an excuse, he is now a very responsible young man in control of himself.  Most people don’t even know he has the condition. 
          But to say that his difficulties do not exist is to deny reality.  You can call it another name, but the condition is still the same.  An excellent book that discusses this, and other difficulties some children have, is “The Difficult Child” by Stanley Turecki.  In the ADHD section, it describes the difficulties that these children have and what to do to help them.

        • TexasOlTimer

          DMJ patriot53  I agree with you. I had one with ADHD and one ‘normal.’ My problems with him and our solution are in a reply above.

        • clinicalthinker

          DMJ 
          DMJ no one denies your claim to have difficulty with your child. Or others you know who have difficulty with their children.

          What is denied is there is a medical malfunction of the brain … which is what these children are tagged with for life.

          Difficult children have been around most likely from the beginning of time. Many reasons can be the cause. A mental malfunction IS NOT ONE OF THEM.
          It is admirable that you with difficulty have apparently solved your child’s behavioral problems.
          Hopefully without drugging him out of his mind with “legal dope”.

  • patriot53

    Always knew this was a crock. If one actually WATCHES these kids and observes WHAT they are doing, it is very clear the great majority of them are seeking attention. From neglectful parents, from authority that deals with them such as in schools, in fact, from anywhere at all they can get it. These kids need ATTENTION – NOT DRUGS. Some of these kids have fetal alcohol poisoning or fetal drug poisoning. Some just have NO ONE who will sit down and read them a book or listen to the recital of their day. 98% of ‘ADHD’ is parental delusion that a child can raise themselves. Most of the other 2% is schools trying to drug kids into submission and quiet. This has ALWAYS been a hoax. The NEXT big hoax that will be “discovered” or admitted to will be the overly broad diagnosis of autism. Just wait and see …

  • captainjimgreen

    I am a university professor and if I have a student who seems distracted or unable to focus on my lecture, I get him involved and the focus then occurs. It’s called engagement and it works quite well. If we care for these young people they respond and do well. They don’t need drugs or anyone telling them they have a physical or mental condition. That is a great disservice to them and all of society!

    • DMJ

      captainjimgreen Those are adults you are dealing with.  It’s not the same as children.  The only benefit to telling a person that he has ADHD is so he or his parents can find ways to overcome the condition.  If I didn’t know what condition my son had, I wouldn’t have been able to seek out the information to help him.

      • captainjimgreen

        DMJ captainjimgreen Our university has a huge program for helping our college aged youth (adults as you call them) deal with ADHD. But there is NO condition of ADHD… that’s what the article stated. The author of this malady who defined the condition admitted it was merely a theory that he derived and on his death bed he basically confessed it was a money making hoax perpetrated on the gullible American public. Sad that we have tens of thousands of innocent young people who are drugged for no reason other than to make them less restless and rambunctious, which condition is a perfectly normal part of growing up. It is wrong and should be stopped summarily! I might add that every single one of the young people who went on shooting rampages, killing innocent people, in recent years, were on or had been on psycho-controlling drugs! What does that tell you?!

        • clinicalthinker

          captainjimgreen

          You are indeed correct there is NO CONDITION OF ADD OR ADHD.
          In the mid-90’s I worked with Dr. Fred Baughman
          who was an adult and child neurologist. He maintained and testified in
          congress there was no Neurological or Medical Malfunction of the brain
          causing ADD or HDHD.
          Today there still is no medical proof of such a condition as far as I know.

          Yet there are many like DMJ  who are victims of this con and unknowingly perpetuate it.
          Those
          who promote this “fantasy disease” of the mind should be prosecuted for
          the havoc and sometimes carnage they have created and continue to
          cause.

  • mandrake1348

    I married a ‘non traditional, modern’ woman in 1983.  We had two children (1985, 1988).  She wanted a career and I thought nothing was wrong with that.  Daycare, preschool, no traditions.  By the time elementary school came over the horizon, I realized that values were important and that Catholic School provided the best education (comparred with public school).  Enrolled them.  The school screened the older one for ADHD and he was put on drugs.  This despite the fact that he was focused when he wanted to be (play, games, TV, Power Rangers etc.) but unfocused when he didn’t want to be.  I opposed the decision to put him on these drugs.  Within one year I was divorced, without my kids (custody was granted to her because I might endanger the child by depriving him of his daily dosage when he visited) and providing child support to my ex and the kids at least in part so she could fool around, keep my last name, and put both of them on these drugs.  It is now 20 years later.  I have one sone displaying all the characteristics listed in this story (my oldest) who is 29, lives at home, has never held a steady job, constantly fantasizes about games, dark movies and who-knows-what.  The younger one was also put on these drugs and is now an unemployed cook and musician who also finds it impossible to hold a steady job, fantasizes about becoming a rock star, and engages in all sorts of risky behaviours.  The bottom line?  These THEORIES destroyed the lives of my two sons, and my own life…all because a married woman believed in them (as a way of subduing and controlling the kids probably) and because I tried to assert a father’s responsibility to bring kids up with values and a sense of responsibility.

    • TexasOlTimer

      mandrake1348I’ve a son, now a grandfather, who had a problem that no one could find. He could focus when interested as in a doctor’s office. I eventually found a doctor when he was 8 that diagnosed him as ‘hyperkinetic’ (now ADHD). This is a syndrome rather than a disease. He put him on medication and it did help with his schoolwork but it had side effects that I didn’t like (I was divorced and had the ability to make the decision – my ex said to keep him on it). After a few months, I took him off and went looking for another solution. I despaired of ever having him even graduate high school. There was no internet then, lived in a small town with only a small library but eventually came across the Feingold diet and we tried it – six weeks no cheating – he’d make the decision at the end of the six weeks as to stay on it or not – he was sixteen at the time and very frightened of his feelings. 
      It worked to such an extent that he didn’t want to go off it. He felt ‘normal’ he said for the first time in his life. It took several more years of trial and error to add and eliminate certain things – he can have no preservatives, artificial colors or flavorings in his food – avoids chemicals (perfumes, household air fresheners, scents in soap, etc., ) and that includes colorings and items in medicine – in addition no chocolate or cherries, nor polyester in clothing. He took all six college prep subjects his junior year (while on the diet) and made the honor roll. He graduated high school with a B average.
      Now he’s a well functioning adult, served in the Navy and has a good job. He was married but divorced when the children were young. His ex was (and is) a very controlling individual with numerous problems that didn’t show up until after the marriage. 
      His son, now an adult, had a similar problem. Recognizing it very early, my son had him tested for food behavioral problems – he can handle all the things my son can’t, except for chocolate, however, my son’s ex-wife (in spite of being at the doctor’s office for the testing) says there’s nothing wrong. Since she had primary custody, there was little my son could do to keep him on his diet. My grandson lives at home (now 24) with his mother and grandmother and cannot hold a job. My son and I despair of ever being able to do anything to help him. He has been so convinced by his mother that there is nothing wrong, that he refuses to see any doctor suggested, even though his dad has offered to cover the complete bill.
      There are none so blind as those that refuse to see. Medicine cannot help everything that we encounter and frequently makes things worse. Sometimes we need to look beyond ‘doctor’s orders’ and take them only as a suggestion. A doctor only knows what he is taught in school and how much he learns in those classes.

    • DMJ

      mandrake1348 From what you describe, your sons do have ADHD.  It is an idiosyncrasy of people with ADHD that they can hyperfocus when they are really interested in something, to the exclusion of anything else going on around them.  Some people think this proves that the person doesn’t have ADHD, but this is an incorrect assumption.
      The problem with what your ex-wife did was that she probably had the kids on too high a dose of medication (I assume Ritalin), and then didn’t raise them to be responsible. It wasn’t the “theories” that destroyed your life; it was a lazy mother who thought she could just subdue her children with medication and forget raising her children.   Even if your children didn’t have ADHD, they would have these problems if raised with no standards!

      • TexasOlTimer

        DMJ mandrake1348   It is an idiosyncrasy that they can focus to the point of having tunnel vision. Trying to get them to stop the activity is sometimes harder than getting them to focus on something else. They have a hard time in school as they are so distracted by all the input around them – noises from the hallway, other students moving, even the feel of their clothing, and can’t don’t have the ability to tune it out to concentrate on the words the teacher is saying. They pick up part of the instructions, try their best to do what they understand they are told to do and fail because they simply didn’t hear all of it. Then are berated by the teacher for not paying attention.
        I was fortunate – I had custody of both my boys – one with ADHD and one without – and I learned early that it was difficult to teach him. He couldn’t understand when he was about 4 or 5 that to hit others hurt – just as it hurt him. THAT took the better part of a year! But learn it he did. I learned that he couldn’t make the connection between a lot of things that were cause and effect. A punishment couldn’t be grounding him from a movie next weekend for a wrong done today. By the weekend, he wouldn’t be able to understand why he couldn’t go. The punishment to be effective to stop whatever behavior it was had to be immediate. 
        And, yes, my grandson has been on whatever medication is the current thing for ADHD and eats all the things (mostly wheat, corn and oats) that create his frequently violent and angry outbursts, which is the biggest reason he can’t hold down a job. The medication only helps him focus – it doesn’t cut the effects of the food on his behavior.

    • DMJ

      Mandrake, I forgot to add that boys that are raised without a father in the home also have problems.